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Active Iron
We made iron better

Active Iron is a next generation iron supplement that is specially formulated to reduce the negative gastro-intestinal side effects associated with traditional oral iron preparations, including nausea, constipation, and diarrhoea.

Why is Iron Important?

Iron is essential to life. It contributes to the reduction of tiredness and fatigue and also plays an important role in normal energy metabolism, oxygen transport, cognitive function, immune function and formation of red blood cells and haemoglobin.

  • Energy Yielding Metabolism
  • Blood Cell Formation
  • Oxygen Transport
  • Cognitive Function
  • Immunity

How iron is stored

Iron is recycled between functional and storage “pools”. Around a quarter of the body’s iron is stored as ferritin, mainly in the liver, ready to be mobilised if the body requires additional iron. The remaining iron is mostly “functional” iron, found predominately in haemoglobin (Hb) in circulating red blood cells but also in myoglobin in skeletal muscle. A small fraction (<1%) circulates in the blood bound to transferrin; this is known as transport iron.

Iron stores are depleted before anaemia develops

Iron deficiency can be viewed as a spectrum from iron depletion through to iron deficiency anaemia dependent on the status of stored iron in the body (figure 1). In iron depletion, levels of stored iron are reduced, while levels of circulating iron in Haemoglobin may not be affected. In iron-deficiency anaemia, red blood cell production is diminished due to a shortage of both stored and circulating iron.

Stored iron is therefore depleted before haemoglobin decreases. Since Iron is essential to all cells symptoms of iron deficiency such as fatigue, irritability, poor concentration and hair loss – may occur even in the absence of anaemia.

Why treating low Iron levels is a challenge?

Standard oral iron supplements can have limitations. Only a small percentage of the iron is absorbed (around 10-15% [1]) and side effects are common which may in turn led to poor compliance.

Evidence suggests around 80-90% of those who take iron report side effects and of those around 50%[2] will stop taking iron as result. Whilst others work around these side effects with intermittent use or use of laxatives. Thus creating a significant issue with patient compliance. Active Iron has been designed to address this challenge. Its ground-breaking protein formula has been designed to reduce gut irritation from iron.

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[1] Santiago P. Ferrous versus ferric oral iron formulations for the treatment of iron deficiency: a clinical overview. The Scientific World Journal 2012, Article ID 846824. Doi:10.1100/2012/846824

[2] Tolkien Z et al. Ferrous sulphate supplementation causes significant gastrointestinal side effects in adults: a systematic review and meta analysis. PLoS ONE 2015; 10(2): e0117383 Doi: 10.1371/journal.pone0117383

[4] Wang et Al - https://www.karger.com/Article/Abstract/480632

Guide to Iron Supplementation in Pregnancy

The demand for iron increases threefold during pregnancy to meet the demands of the growing fetus and placenta as well as maternal adaptions to pregnancy. [1] It is estimated that 30-40% of pregnant women in industrialised countries are iron deficient. [2]

Iron deficiency during pregnancy is associated with several complications including increased risk of preterm birth, lower birth weight and perinatal mortality. It is also linked to maternal postpartum fatigue and depressive symptoms and infant iron deficiency in the first three months of life. Treating iron deficiency offers considerable benefits to both mother and baby.

Many women, especially those who experience heavy menstrual bleeding, already have low iron reserves at the time of conception, putting them at even greater risk of iron deficiency during pregnancy. It is estimated that 10-20% of menstruating women are iron deficient. [3]

Read The Guide

[1] UN Children’s Fund, UN University, World Health Organisation. Iron deficiency anaemia: assessment, prevention and control. A guide for programme managers, 2001.

[2] NICE Anaemia – iron deficiency. September 2018

[3] Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition. Iron and Health. 2010 https://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/ Accessed June 2019

*Solvotrin Iron Supplement Research in the UK, August 2018

 

 

New Report On Iron Explains Most Common Vitamin And Mineral Deficiency In UK

Dr Dawn Harper has released a new iron report sponsored by Active Iron. The report has revealed that many of us don’t know how much iron we need, or how to get it. The essential mineral is explained in Dr Dawn’s new report, as well as the importance of iron for the human body.

“Iron deficiency anaemia is the most common vitamin and mineral deficiency in the UK,” says health expert Dr Dawn. Symptoms include fatigue, pale skin and a racing heart.

So why are we suffering? If you’re low in iron, a supplement can help you beat tiredness. The number one reason people take them in the UK is to help fight anaemia, says a new survey.* But, many people experience side-effects coupled with poor absorption when they take supplements. Dr Dawn outlines the problems with traditional iron supplements in her report and what you can do to avoid them.

Your daily iron requirements vary according to your age and gender. There is a significant difference in iron requirements for men and women. Males aged 18-plus and women over 50 need 8.7mg daily. However, it’s recommended that girls aged 13-plus and women under 50 have 14.8mg. Those particularly at risk of low iron include pregnant women, people with digestive disorders, those who exercise a lot and vegetarians and vegans who don’t follow a balanced diet.

Iron is found in a variety of foods but it’s important that you’re absorbing it properly. “Even if you enjoy balanced meals, most people absorb only 10 per cent of iron from their diet,” explains Dr Harper.

Read the full report here »

Edel Quirke, Pharmacist